Packing and Moving Part 3 Fridge and Freezer

Packing & Moving Part 3: Fridge and Freezer

As was discussed in Part 2, “Packing & Moving: Range & Dishwasher”, even if you are hiring a professional to do your packing and moving, these tips for preparing your fridge and freezer will still be relevant. Again, your particular moving company will inform you of your specific responsibilities regarding your household appliances. As always, it is important to consult your owner’s manual/manufacturer as they serve as the ultimate authority. The tips below are meant to serve only as guidelines to help you.

Moving companies do not disconnect or service household appliances, it is the home owner’s responsibility to be sure this is done. However, many moving companies will contract someone for you if you request it, but it is a third-party service that will be charged to your bill of lading (typically with some mark up). Of course you can always contact Gord’s Appliance directly to service your household appliances pre/post move as we do provide this service at a reasonable price.

Fridge

A refrigerator can develop mold and a terrible odour if it is not thoroughly cleaned prior to a move (particularly with moves of significant distance in hot weather, or if long term storage is involved). Unplug the fridge a minimum of 24 hours before your move to allow air to circulate and to ensure the fridge is completely dry – more time is needed if you do not have a frost-free model. Removable parts should be washed in mild detergent and warm water (never use harsh abrasive cleansers). The inside should be wiped down completely with a damp rag using a mild detergent and warm water. Be sure everything is dry before you put shelves and trays back inside. (Remember to get as much of the seals and crevices around the door as possible with something like an old, soft toothbrush.) Glass shelves should be packed separately in appropriate cartons. If your fridge is going to be in long term storage, I would recommend putting some dry coffee grounds in a paper lunch bag stapled shut inside the fridge and freezer units. This will absorb any latent moisture or odour. Clean off the back of the refrigerator with the brush attachment of your vacuum cleaner if there is lint build up. Wipe down all around the outside and remove the base covering so you can vacuum off the compressor or condenser. Empty and clean the evaporator tray and allow it ample time to dry. If your refrigerator is an older model, the compressor or motor may have to be bolted down, though most newer models have sealed units that don’t require this. If your particular fridge has an ice maker or a water dispenser the water must be turned off and the water line disconnected as well as the water reservoir emptied. Be sure doors are secured shut and cords are taped up out of the way.

Freezer

Because freezers are not designed to be shipping containers, it is best to empty your chest freezer or upright freezer before a move. The contents shifting during transit can cause plastic mouldings inside the freezer to crack and plastic shelves can be damaged as well. Also, there is no way to be sure that the temperature inside a freezer will remain at a food-safe level once a freezer is unplugged. Even if you are just going a freezershort distance, I recommend emptying your freezer and cleaning it thoroughly. As with your refrigerator, 24 hours is the minimum amount of time that your freezer should be unplugged prior to the move. More time is required if you do not have a frost-free model as it will need to be defrosted first, cleaned with a mild detergent and warm water and allowed ample time to dry. (Try the same trick described for the fridge of using the dry coffee grounds in the stapled shut paper bag to absorb latent moisture and odour while your freezer is in transit and in storage.) Remember to allow your freezer to sit for 24 hours before you plug it in and use it again. This allows the oil in the compressor to settle so that it does not get damaged.

Avoid Unnecessary Service Calls

It is true that an ounce of prevention is often worth a pound of cure. The little bit of time required to properly prepare your appliances for a move could forestall the need for a service technician later. Follow the instructions of your moving company/owner’s manual or manufacturer as applicable.

Packing and Moving Tips Gords ApplianceIf you have some unique moving tips to share here, your input is always welcome.

Gord Haines is a journeyman appliance technician with over 25 years of experience. Contact Gord’s Appliance for parts, repair and servicing of all your residential appliances.

Packing and Moving Part 2 – Stove and Dishwasher

Packing and Moving Part 2 – Stove and Dishwasher

Even if you are hiring a professional to do your packing and moving, many of the following tips for preparing your household appliances will still be relevant. Your particular moving company will inform you of your specific responsibilities regarding your appliances. If you are doing your packing and moving yourself, there are some important things to bear in mind when it comes to readying your household appliances for a move. It is important to consult your owner’s manual/manufacturer as they serve as the ultimate authority. My tips below are meant to serve only as guidelines to help you.

Many moving companies do not disconnect or service household appliances; it is the home owner’s responsibility to be sure this is done. However, most moving companies will contract someone for you, if you request it, but it is a third-party service that will be charged to your bill of lading (typically with a mark up). Of course you can always contact Gord’s Appliance directly to prepare all of your household appliances as we do provide this service.

Oven/Stove/Range

A week or two in advance of your moving day, clean your traditional oven or run your self-cleaning oven through a cleaning cycle. (Then take special care not to spill anything in there between cleaning day and moving day!) Pre-cleaning is especially important if oven - rangeyour kitchen appliances will be in storage for any length of time at all. Food debris in a dark, enclosed space promotes mold growth. It is never a pleasant experience to move into a clean new place and unpack a stinky, moldy range. As close to moving day as you can, clean the exterior of your range. (If the top pops up be sure to do in there too.) If you have a gas oven, you will need to call ahead and schedule your gas company to come and disconnect your gas and cap off the pipes. I suggest packing oven racks separately, but if you want to keep them with the range, be sure they are well secured inside it. Finally, be sure cords are taped to the range so that they don’t get damaged or trip someone. The door and oven drawer need to be taped shut for transit. (You can use the inside of the oven to transport pillows or something else very light weight that won’t shift around inside the oven.)

Dishwasher

I recommend cleaning your dishwasher a week or so prior to your move, particularly if you are going any distance. (I talk about cleaning your dishwasher in my blog entitled “Calgary, Hard Water & Dishwashers”.) The day before your move, shut off the electricity and water supply to your dishwasher. Disconnect the hoses and drain them. Once they are dry, wrap them in towels and set them aside. Disconnect and drain the water inlet line and the water valve. Soak up any water on the bottom of the dishwasher (remove the pump cover if applicable). Set the dry hoses wrapped in towels inside the dishwasher and tape the door shut. Be sure any cords or knobs are taped down.

Avoid Unnecessary Service Calls

It is true that an ounce of prevention is often worth a pound of cure. The little bit of time required to properly prepare your appliances for a move could forestall the need for a service technician later. Follow the instructions of your moving company/owner’s manual or manufacturer as applicable.

If you have some unique moving tips to share here, your input is always welcome.

Packing and Moving Tips Gords Appliance

 

Gord Haines is a journeyman appliance technician with over 25 years of experience. Contact Gord’s Appliance for repair, parts and servicing of all your residential appliances.

Packing and Moving Your Home

Packing and Moving Part 1:

Kitchen and Household

If you are hiring a professional moving company to do your packing as well as your move, many of tips outlined below are not necessarily relevant. If you are packing and moving yourself, here are a few tips to help you prepare. (Packing & Moving Part 2 will discuss readying your household appliances for your move and will be relevant for people hiring a professional mover as well.)

packing and moving

professional mover packing china

In my opinion the keys to a successful do-it-yourself move are organization and communication.

Pre-planning

The more things you can pre-plan and execute in advance of moving day, the better.

Kids and Pets

If you have very small children and you can arrange for them to go stay with someone for a couple of days this is much easier than having to divide your time between keeping your kids out of harm’s way and trying to move. It is safer and less stressful for everyone if you have somewhere for them to go. If you don’t have someone that can take them that long then take advantage of whatever babysitting may be available to you – even if for just a few hours. Depending on the situation and the pet, it may also be a good idea to have someone pet sit if you have a lot of people going in and out to load/unload. If you think you may have a tough time keeping tabs on your cat or dog, see if someone can help you.

Packing Supplies

Packing supplies such as cube boxes, wardrobe boxes, packing paper and bubble wrap are often more economical in the long run than random boxes and newspaper. Random box sizes are awkward and more time consuming to load and newspaper leaves messy black marks which you then have to clean up. Proper supplies are not very expensive; you can even check on Kijiji, Craig’s List or a U-Haul box exchange. Sometimes people drop their used boxes off at moving companies which give them out on a first-come-first-served basis. You can rent moving pads, but remember that bedding can double as corner protectors and padding for furniture as well.

Packing

You can pack up storage rooms/basement, the garage/shed, spare room all well before moving day. (Leave out a couple of coolers if you think you will need them for items from your refrigerator or freezer.) Then get to work on unnecessary or seldom used items from the rest of the rooms, all the while taking stalk of your stuff to see if there is anything you need to sell or give away. As moving day approaches you should have everything packed except the essentials. If you are moving a long distance, it is wise to be sure CDs and DVDs aren’t packed to go in the moving truck. It can get hot enough to warp discs and cause aerosols to explode. Keep hazardous materials, plants and liquids off of your moving truck.

The Necessities Box

You can’t pack this box in advance of your move, but you can at least make a check list so that everything you want gets packed in here. This will be the last thing out and the first thing in and should go in the cab of your moving truck or your own personal vehicle. You don’t want this to get loaded with the rest of the boxes! (Pack such things as coffee and filters, coffee pot, mugs, cutlery, paper plates, granola/protein bars, microwaveable dish/medium saucepan, multipurpose cleaner with rags or J clothes, dishtowel, dishcloth, paper towel, toilet paper, multi-head screw driver, pliers, bottle of water, tape, marker, scissors, salt and pepper, matches, note pad, sandwich baggies, shower curtain, bath towel, toiletry bags, Ibuprofren /Acitaminophen…) And along with the Necessities Box, be sure to have a couple of cases of water so you and your help, if you are fortunate to have some, can stay hydrated. You don’t want people digging cups out of boxes that have been packed and taped shut.

The Kitchen

Use up as many things from your freezer and pantry in the days leading up to your move as you can. Be creative rather than going grocery shopping. If you eat it, you don’t have to pack it and move it! Pack up small appliances that you won’t need, cook books, stemware and non-essentials from your pantry in advance. Not that I am for environmental irresponsibility, but just this once, maybe use paper plates and cups the day before the move so that you can pack up all the dishes. There is some good information online from moving companies about how to pack breakables.

Bedrooms

Most people are exhausted by the end of moving day and don’t need to be searching for parts to put the beds together. Be sure all of the tools needed to reassemble beds are in the Necessities Box. Put screws and bolts into a baggie and tape it to a piece of bed frame.

Art and Electronics

The pros recommend packing your art in mirror boxes designed for flat and fragile pieces. If you don’t have the original boxes for your electronics, moving companies have specialty boxes for that type of thing as well as well.

Communication

If you can, sketch a layout of the new place and be sure each room has a name. As you are packing your boxes, be sure to label them with the destination room and the box’s general contents, for example, “Jake’s Room – Toy Box”. Write the room names on a piece of paper to be taped over the door of the room so that anyone helping you unload knows which room is which. It is a good idea to map out where you want all large pieces of furniture on your sketch and post it so that people helping you know where to place furniture. Preparing your appliances for a move is a significant undertaking.

There are some excellent tips on moving company websites as well; I would highly recommend reading through them and taking some notes. The more organized you can be, the more smoothly things should go come moving day.

“Packing & Moving Part” 2 will address what to do to get your stove (oven/range) and dishwasher ready to move, Part 3 will cover the fridge and freezer, and Part 4 will conclude with the washer and dryer.  If you have some unique moving tips to share here, your input is always welcome.

Gord Haines is a journeyman appliance technician with over 25 years of experience.  Packing and Moving Tips Gords ApplianceContact Gord’s Appliance for repair and servicing of all your residential appliances.